Electricity Rates

If you’ve ever looked at your electric bill, you’ve seen that you pay a certain amount per kilowatt hour. This can vary from state to state and even city to city. Below I’ve included seven electricity rates by state comparison charts to give you a better idea of how each state ranks. You’ll find out if your state falls within the top 10 cheapest or most expensive states as well! First, we need to talk a little bit about the average electricity rate and deregulation.

Average Electricity Rate

The average electricity rate in the United States is 13.30 cents per kilowatt hour. Later, you’ll find several tables comparing each state for residential and consumer rates. Let’s talk a bit about deregulation first. 

What Does Electricity Deregulation Mean And What Is It?

What Does Electricity Deregulation Mean And What Is It?When electricity is deregulated, part of the ownership from the utility is taken away. The utility will still have a few operations, but it gives a lot more power to the customer. The government isn’t as involved either. This allows for several benefits for the customer, but more on that later. There often becomes competition within the market itself, allowing for an even higher chance of lowered prices

Is Deregulation Good For Consumers?

Deregulation has its pros and cons. People who are for it like that when you reduce the government’s control, the prices will often lower. On top of that, services will expand and the customer will be more heard. Those who are opposed to it tend to like things the way they are. Whether it’s good or not for the consumer, is up to each consumer individually. In general, it creates lower prices, economic growth, greener energy, and more.

Electricity Comparison Tables

Now, let’s take a look at the factors for electric rates, which states pay the most, the least, and how it works for commercial companies as well. 

Factors That Influence Electricity Prices

Electricity can range quite a bit, depending on the type of customer you are. Usually, residential and business consumers cost the most. Those in the industrial industries use more than residents and businesses, but they can receive it at a higher voltage which makes it easier to supply. The easier electricity is to supply, the less it’s going to cost the consumer. 

Customer TypeAverage Price
Residential12.89¢ per kWh
Commercial10.66¢ per kWh
Industrial6.93¢ per kWh
Transportation9.77¢ per kWh

Residential Rates By State

Which States Consume The Most Energy?

StateAverage monthly consumption (kWh)
Louisiana1,187
Tennessee1,150
Alabama1,136
Mississippi1,132
Texas1,112
Florida1,089
South Carolina1,082
Virginia1,078
North Dakota1,063
Georgia1,062

10 Cheapest Residential Electricity Rates By States

StateNov-19 Rates
Louisiana9.57 ¢ / kWh
Washington10.06 ¢ / kWh
Arkansas10.08 ¢ / kWh
Idaho10.18 ¢ / kWh
Oklahoma10.61 ¢ / kWh
Kentucky10.62 ¢ / kWh
Tennessee10.8 ¢ / kWh
Utah11.17 ¢ / kWh
Oregon11.18 ¢ / kWh
Mississippi11.22 ¢ / kWh

10 Most Expensive Residential Electricity Rates By State

StateNov-19 Rates
Hawaii31.16 ¢ / kWh
Alaska23.56 ¢ / kWh
Rhode Island21.76 ¢ / kWh
Massachusetts21.54 ¢ / kWh
Connecticut21.29 ¢ / kWh
California19.86 ¢ / kWh
New Hampshire19.47 ¢ / kWh
New York18.39 ¢ / kWh
Maine17.90 ¢ / kWh
Vermont16.68 ¢ / kWh

Residential Electricity Rates By State 

StateRates
Alabama12.41 ¢ / kWh
Alaska22.54 ¢ / kWh
Arizona13.16 ¢ / kWh
Arkansas9.99 ¢ / kWh
California19.90 ¢ / kWh
Colorado12.28 ¢ / kWh
Connecticut21.62 ¢ / kWh
Washington D.C13.21 ¢ / kWh
Delaware12.05 ¢ / kWh
Florida11.37 ¢ / kWh
Georgia12.26 ¢ / kWh
Idaho10.58 ¢ / kWh
Illinois12.56 ¢ / kWh
Indiana12.02 ¢ / kWh
Iowa13.81 ¢ / kWh
Kansas11.56 ¢ / kWh
Kentucky10.56 ¢ / kWh
Louisiana9.37 ¢ / kWh
Maine16.16 ¢ / kWh
Maryland13.92 ¢ / kWh
Massachusetts21.11 ¢ / kWh
Michigan16.07 ¢ / kWh
Minnesota14.09 ¢ / kWh
Mississippi11.55 ¢ / kWh
Missouri13.23 ¢ / kWh
Montana11.85 ¢ / kWh
Nebraska11.31 ¢ / kWh
Nevada11.67 ¢ / kWh
New Hampshire19.63 ¢ / kWh
New Jersey15.64 ¢ / kWh
New Mexico13.37 ¢ / kWh
New York19.30 ¢ / kWh
North Carolina11.24 ¢ / kWh
North Dakota12.07 ¢ / kWh
Ohio12.64 ¢ / kWh
Oklahoma10.72 ¢ / kWh
Oregon11.02 ¢ / kWh
Pennsylvania14.38 ¢ / kWh
Rhode Island18.64 ¢ / kWh
South Carolina12.91 ¢ / kWh
South Dakota12.39 ¢ / kWh
Tennessee10.79 ¢ / kWh
Texas11.36 ¢ / kWh
Utah10.63 ¢ / kWh
Vermont18.50 ¢ / kWh
Virginia12.40 ¢ / kWh
Washington9.79 ¢ / kWh
West Virginia11.57 ¢ / kWh
Wisconsin14.28 ¢ / kWh
Wyoming12.30 ¢ / kWh

Commercial Electricity Rates By State

StateAugust 2019August 2018
Alabama11.7 ¢ / kWh11.2 ¢ / kWh
Alaska20 ¢ / kWh18.5 ¢ / kWh
Arizona10.9 ¢ / kWh11.2 ¢ / kWh
Arkansas8.7 ¢ / kWh7.6 ¢ / kWh
California19.1 ¢ / kWh18.7 ¢ / kWh
Colorado10.7 ¢ / kWh10.4 ¢ / kWh
Connecticut16.7 ¢ / kWh16.4 ¢ / kWh
Delaware9 ¢ / kWh9.4 ¢ / kWh
Florida9.3 ¢ / kWh8.9 ¢ / kWh
Georgia10 ¢ / kWh9.9 ¢ / kWh
Hawaii28.9 ¢ / kWh30 ¢ / kWh
Idaho7.8 ¢ / kWh8.1 ¢ / kWh
Illinois8.9 ¢ / kWh9.1 ¢ / kWh
Indiana10.7 ¢ / kWh10.6 ¢ / kWh
Iowa12.2 ¢ / kWh11.4 ¢ / kWh
Kansas10.5 ¢ / kWh11.1 ¢ / kWh
Kentucky9.7 ¢ / kWh9.5 ¢ / kWh
Louisiana8.6 ¢ / kWh8.8 ¢ / kWh
Maine12.4 ¢ / kWh12.2 ¢ / kWh
Maryland9.6 ¢ / kWh10.1 ¢ / kWh
Massachusetts16.2 ¢ / kWh17 ¢ / kWh
Michigan11.5 ¢ / kWh10.9 ¢ / kWh
Minnesota11 ¢ / kWh10.8 ¢ / kWh
Mississippi10.3 ¢ / kWh10 ¢ / kWh
Missouri10.3 ¢ / kWh10.4 ¢ / kWh
Montana10.6 ¢ / kWh9.9 ¢ / kWh
Nebraska9.4 ¢ / kWh9.4 ¢ / kWh
Nevada8.6 ¢ / kWh8.2 ¢ / kWh
New Hampshire15.6 ¢ / kWh15.3 ¢ / kWh
New Jersey12.8 ¢ / kWh12.6 ¢ / kWh
New Mexico10.5 ¢ / kWh10.7 ¢ / kWh
New York15.2 ¢ / kWh15.5 ¢ / kWh
North Carolina9 ¢ / kWh8.7 ¢ / kWh
North Dakota9.5 ¢ / kWh9.6 ¢ / kWh
Ohio9.3 ¢ / kWh9.9 ¢ / kWh
Oklahoma8.4 ¢ / kWh8.6 ¢ / kWh
Oregon8.7 ¢ / kWh9.4 ¢ / kWh
Pennsylvania8.5 ¢ / kWh8.8 ¢ / kWh
Rhode Island15.5 ¢ / kWh15.8 ¢ / kWh
South Carolina10.2 ¢ / kWh8.1 ¢ / kWh
South Dakota10 ¢ / kWh10.1 ¢ / kWh
Tennessee10.7 ¢ / kWh10.6 ¢ / kWh
Texas8.4 ¢ / kWh8.2 ¢ / kWh
Utah8.8 ¢ / kWh8.4 ¢ / kWh
Vermont15.8 ¢ / kWh15.1 ¢ / kWh
Virginia8.1 ¢ / kWh8.4 ¢ / kWh
Washington8.7 ¢ / kWh8.6 ¢ / kWh
West Virginia8.7 ¢ / kWh9 ¢ / kWh
Wisconsin11.2 ¢ / kWh10.8 ¢ / kWh
Wyoming9.6 ¢ / kWh9.6 ¢ / kWh
Washington D.C.11 ¢ / kWh11 ¢ / kWh

Comparison Table Of Select States

StateRate
California16.7 ¢ / kWh
Connecticut17.24 ¢ / kWh
Delaware13.58 ¢ / kWh
Illinois11.38 ¢ / kWh
Maine14.66 ¢ / kWh
Maryland12.84 ¢ / kWh
Massachusetts14.91 ¢ / kWh
New Hampshire16.07 ¢ / kWh
New Jersey15.78 ¢ / kWh
New York21.00 ¢ / kWh
Ohio11.76 ¢ / kWh
Pennsylvania13.86 ¢ / kWh
Rhode Island14.40 ¢ / kWh
Texas10.98 ¢ / kWh
Washington D.C.12.21 ¢ / kWh

Summary

As you can tell, rates can vary quite a bit. States like New York, California, Hawaii, and Alaska tend to have higher prices across the board. This can be for several reasons, whether it’s based on population or lack of electric companies available. Either way, now you’re a bit more educated about what electricity deregulation is and how much electricity can range from state to state. We hope this gave you some insight into all things electricity!